Key Strategies for Successful Landing

 

Here at Expat Journals we believe that successful global transition begins with a clear assessment of your situation and thoughtful planning. It seems self-evident, but in reality, those about to transfer are often working with incomplete information, cross cultural confusion and unrealistic expectations.

With that in mind, here are our 3 essential strategies that will make any relocation far, far easier. And yes, you already know you need them, but how many of us take the time to actually DO them..?

 

1. Before You Go – Location Orientation

Many transferring companies provide some destination orientation training, but it often focuses on the working environment rather than the living one. If you have the chance for professional help, take it, but don’t just stop there – there is a wealth of information out there that can help you better prepare and adapt to your new home.

Guides like the Lonely Planet and Rough Guide both have excellent sections on the local environment, cultures and expected behaviours for visitors, along with a language starter guide. Remember that you are not on vacation, and many other guides assume that many of your basic daily needs will be met by a hotel, so opt for the backpacker and independent travel guides  - they are written for people who have greater contact with locals and are looking after their own living needs.

There are also a wealth of great government sites (check out our Resources section for our favorites), with up to date travel advisories.

Blogs, expat websites, forums and social media networks give you great insight into your new home through the eyes of an expat, and can offer a way to make contacts with like minded local residents without leaving your couch. It’s currently a hugely underutilized resource in terms of cultural orientation, possibly because of the sheer volume and varying quality.

I’ve listed some of my favorites at the bottom (feel free to suggest your own) – many offer local guides for a fee, and a listing of expat blogs by country. Contact the blog authors, read their articles and the comments of others, and build a picture of the day-to day challenges that expat family life will present.

Many expat groups have a Page on Facebook – simply searching the term ‘expat’ and your new location will generate listings. Doing the same search on Twitter will put you in touch with plenty of people willing to share their knowledge, and allows you a less formal method of contact than email. However, remember that with social media, you are also sharing a great deal of information about yourself, so read Rachel's guide to using social media before you start.

If you prefer to meet people face to face, Internations is another place to meet a huge variety of expats from across the globe, with monthly meetings in many cities. They also have an excellent online resource and community.

To help you get a head start, check out the free Expat Journals Reconnaisance Guide by signing up here!

 

2. As Soon As You Arrive – Find a Mentor.

The Armed Forces, established experts at the task of relocating people, have long been advocates of mentors for transitioning individuals and families, but the corporate world has yet to catch up. The good news is that the expat community is a very supportive one that understands the challenges faced on international assignment, and is always ready to rally to the cause, so don’t be shy about asking for help and finding a mentor.

We’re not talking about finding a friend here –  you don’t even need to like your mentor, as long as you respect their opinion. You are looking for is someone who has a good working knowledge of your new location, has an enviable list of contacts, and has recommendations that they are willing to share. You don’t need to agree with their choices or follow all of their advice, but having a place to start will save you time, money and considerable frustration. It’s about getting the information to get things done in the most effective way possible.

Your mentor provides a number of functions – they can point you in the direction of essential goods and services, help you navigate your first weeks in your new environment, and provide an early warning system for problems that you might face.

Ask your transferring company whether they have anyone locally or in your host country who knows the ropes or look for spouses of work colleagues, PTA members or expat welcome groups. Your relationship might not extend beyond a shared coffee, a phone number and a list of people and places, so try to have a list of what you need already prepared. Many international schools have a welcome program for new families, and be sure to ake friends with the the school secretary; s/he has usually seen it all before and can be a vast repository of knowledge!

 

3. Once The Dust Has Settled – Continued Cross Cultural Training / Support.

Research has shown that most cross cultural learning takes places between the 6th and 12th month of any assignment. Before that, the practicalities of establishing a home, school and work life take priority, and after a year, most people have settled into some sort of daily routine both in terms of tasks and behaviors.

Those who have been through expatriation before will tell you that most corporate cross-cultural provision happens either before the transfer or immediately after – both points at which you might be distracted, bewildered and often struggling with the logistical arrangements of family life. By the time you realize that you need help, it has disappeared into the sunset with the rest of your expat life delusions.

There is good news, however. Most cross-cultural training is delivered by independent consultants, many of whom are happy to provide ongoing private services, both in person or via online coaching. They are familiar with the unique demands of temporary life overseas, and can provide a listening ear, sage counsel to help you with day-to-day dilemmas, and a compassionate shoulder if it all becomes too much. So if your relocation package provision has ended, or if you are relocating independently, it’s well worth exploring the idea of a intercultural or expat coach to help you gain understanding and get the answers to that most fundamental of questions.

The CiCollective has a membership program that provides you with a wealth of cross cultural knowledge in ebooks, webinars and through their network of experts. If you would like to find out more, contact trisha@cicollective.com.

Finally, remember that journaling is one of the most powerful tools in your adaptation process, so be sure to include it in your activities. Finding Home Abroad is a carefully crafted series of prompts, insights and resources that take you from pre-launch to six months post-move and beyond. Your writing allows you to observe, acknowledge and reflect on both the world around you and your own responses, and not only support your transition, but provide a powerful record of your personal journey, both geographical, cultural and emotional.